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Good Day, Bad Day – Graeae Theatre Company | Review

Shows like Good Day, Bad Day put things in perspective from a first-person narrative, from the inside looking out, as opposed to a documentary-style story from the outside in. A woman (Cherylee Houston) is at the very start of her day, still in bed. The screen is split such that her positive side is interacting with her negative side – in other words, there’s an internal dialogue going on. There are some interesting insights into the daily struggles the woman encounters as a wheelchair user: she can’t go shopping, for instance, without someone asking, “What’s wrong with you?” and/or “Did you have an accident?” when all she wants to do is go about her business.

Good Day, Bad Day - Graeae Theatre Company

The ‘good’ side, perhaps predictably, wants to see the positives, and insists that other people are simply trying to be friendly and helpful. For the so-called ‘bad’ side, though, finds having to explain herself more of a hindrance than a help. It brought to mind an older man, no longer with us, who told me how much he hated it when people kept doors open for him: instead of finding it convenient, he felt he was under pressure to hurry up and get to the door sooner rather than later.

It would be better if “the young ‘uns” would let the “damn door” go and be on their way and leave him to pass through in his own time.

There seem to be alternative views on everything from human rights campaigns to Love Island. The quality of the video recording isn’t the best, for whatever reason, and there are occasional gestures that the audience misses, being out of shot. It is the sort of discussion that could (and probably should) form a sixty-minute show rather than a ten-minute one. Nonetheless, it is heartily perceptive in grappling with contemporary living.

4 stars

Review by Chris Omaweng

GOOD DAY, BAD DAY
by Karen Featherstone
starring Cherylee Houston
A woman picks a fight with herself. A reminder that who we are depends on the day.

https://graeae.org/

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