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If We Got Some More Cocaine I Could Show You How I Love You | Review

If We Got Some More Cocaine I Could Show You How I Love You
If We Got Some More Cocaine I Could Show You How I Love You – Credit Claudia Marinara

The title to John O’Donovan’s If We Got Some More Cocaine I Could Show You How Much I Love You ultimately proves to be a misleading one, as the two male leads lack neither cocaine or an ability to express their love for one another, at least.

What the characters do struggle to articulate is their identity as young gay men within a small Irish community and within their own families, and Georgia de Grey’s fully convincing rooftop set does an excellent job of communicating the precariousness of their respective situations as they struggle to find a foothold or something secure to grasp.

Trapped on the roof as the two characters seek to escape in the wake of a robbery, the confined setting also aptly represents their entrapment within society. They lack the money, understanding, and support needed to fly the invisible prison walls around them. A literal prison itself is a looming reality throughout the play, too, culminating in a gripping finale and decision to be made.

Josh Williams superbly plays a wounded but eloquent English outsider trapped in a poisonous domestic situation caused by his mother’s abusive partner, desperately missing his childhood in London. Yet to come-out to either his family or most of his friends, his psychological fragility lays at the heart of the play’s development.

Set against this, is Alan Mahon’s ribald and seemingly robust 24-year-old Irish native, who answers his problems and other people’s prejudice with his fists. His violence and volubility disguise his own vulnerability – something that gradually starts to emerge during the show’s 70 minutes, even amongst a fusillade of funny one-liners.

John O’Donovan’s script is, it has to be said, a little flabby in some places, and the dialogue is a little one-paced at times. However, things rachet-up dramatically in the play’s final sequence, with agonising and life-changing consequences.

If We Got Some More Cocaine I Could Show You How Much I Love You is a tender and witty portrayal of two lovers at a point of crisis, with their pasts and the police circling ever closer – very appropriate, then, for the claustrophobic underground vaults at Waterloo.

3 Star Review

Review by Ben Miller

Offie-nominated If We Got Some More Cocaine I Could Show You How I Love You is a play of small dreams and big hopes. John O’Donovan’s working-class love story explores the ways people find love and kindness, even when oppression kicks them from all angles.

Loveable tearaways Mikey and Casey are stuck on a roof. As they wait for the Guards to stop circling the house, they find that there are some truths you can’t climb down from. Set twenty feet up, this raucous romantic drama follows two young men as they smoke, drink and snort their way towards discovering love.

Producer Alan Mahon, One Duck Theatre
Writer John O’Donovan
Director Thomas Martin
Designer Georgia de Grey

Sound Design and
Composition Jon McLeod
Lighting Designer Derek Anderson
Movement Designer Sue Mythen
Associate Lighting Designer Sheila Murphy
Casey Josh Williams
Mikey Alan Mahon

If We Got Some More Cocaine I Could Show You How I Love You
VAULT Festival, The Vaults, Leake Street, London SE1 7NN
Wednesday 14th – Sunday 25th February 2018

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